Red Sunshine Juice

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A week or two ago I tried to do a juice detox. It didn’t go very well, but I’ll be trying again soon:) Something about not eating made me a little crazy and by dinner I couldn’t take it any more. What I did find was that I wasn’t exactly hungry, I just felt the need to eat. It probably has something to do with a  sugar addiction or something. Anyhow, I did create some great juice recipes and continue to juice for breakfast to change things up from my typical smoothie. I find that juicing gives me an extra boost of energy in the morning! Drinking juice on an empty stomach means all of those vitamins and minerals are going straight to our bodies because they do not need to be heavily digested.

I would say this recipe is for “beginning juicers”, as it’s pretty sweet. The idea is to start with 2 or 3 sweet vegetables, and as you become accustomed to the taste cut them down to maybe 1. Even the twins love this one!!

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Red Sunshine Juice- Yields one 16oz serving

  • 1 cup of organic greens (I rotate the greens that I use each week; spinach, kale, swiss chard, collard greens, etc.)
  • 1 beet
  • 2 carrots or a handful of baby carrots
  • 2 celery stalks
  • 1/2 of a seedless cucumber
  • 1 apple

I typically juice them in the above order, but I’m not sure that it really matters. I refrigerate it for about 30 minutes after juicing so that it is nice and cold! It will last about 12 hours before some of the enzymes start to die off, so drink up!

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Enjoy!

Moving Mommy

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2013- The Food Movement in Review

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Overall, I think that 2013 was a good year for those of us in the “food movement”. People are becoming more educated, and are starting to make healthier choices for their families. There have also been some major setbacks, but that is to be expected. Change doesn’t happen overnight, or in a week, a month, or a year. It takes time and people spreading the message to accomplish great things. Thank you to all of you out there voting with your dollars, marching, or educating yourselves on our food system! Here are some of the highlights and low points of 2013.

1. Chipotle becomes first restaurant to voluntarily label GMOs, and is now trying to go GMO free. It’s nice to have a good choice out there while traveling! We had Chipotle at 6am at the airport last week:)

2. Kraft removes artificial dyes from some of its products. The regular mac and cheese still contains the dyes, but many of the ones geared specifically toward children will not (SpongeBob etc.).

3. Original Cheerios goes GMO free. I think this technically happened in the first few days of this year, but who’s counting? Sometime in the near future, original Cheerios will be GMO free. It’s probably the least difficult one for them to change, as corn starch and sugar are the only two things that would be GMO anyway, but it’s a start!

4. March Against Monsanto has 2 million marchers worldwide. 2 million is a lot of people!

5. Connecticut and Maine pass GMO labeling laws. Hopefully more will follow suit!

Now for the bad news…

1. Washington state GMO labeling bill fails. It’s hard for the food movement to keep up with the millions being thrown into advertising by Big Food!

2. 50% of chicken tested contains antibiotic resistant bacteria. Gross. And Scary. The EU has reduced their salmonella contamination to below 1%, ours is still hovering between 11-16% each year. I know this is less a food movement issue and more a public health concern, but it’s so alarming that I thought I’d address it. Eat antibiotic free chicken!

3. A bill has been introduced that would allow products that contain GMOs to be labeled ‘natural’ or ‘all natural’. Thankfully, it’s not law…yet.

4. The Obama administration appointed a former Monsanto lobbyist as the new head of food safety.

That’s all I can think of off the top of my head, but I’m sure I’ve missed some! It was a busy year for the foodies of the US, and hopefully 2014 will be as well. Is there anything that you noticed that I missed? Let me know in the comments!!!

If you are curious about my feelings on GMOs and all things food, read this post.

Until our next adventure,

Moving Mommy

Gluten-Free?

I’ve always been a little skeptical of the gluten-free craze that has taken off over the past several years. It seemed like out of the blue tons of people stopped eating gluten; why? Then I started doing some research, and maybe there is something to it. Obviously, people with Celiac disease cannot have gluten, but that is only about 10% of the population. What I’ve found is that many more people have gluten sensitivities, which can only be diagnosed by cutting out gluten. Many people who I have spoken with feel so much better since going gluten-free. Wheat is in a much different, more processed form than it was when our grandparents ate it. Maybe it’s the gluten, maybe it’s the process used now, I’m not sure. I still didn’t really have any desire to go gluten-free, as it would be a total nightmare for the kids.

Will has eczema, and has since about the time I stopped nursing. It comes and goes, and until now I just used Cetaphil to moisturize his skin and it has worked ok. All of a sudden, it has gotten really bad. He’s covered in it and I feel terrible for him. The only thing the doctors can do is put him on steroids, which I only want to do as a last resort. Hydrocortisone cream works some, but I would much rather find the source of the problem than constantly have to treat it. The problem is that no one really knows what causes it, only that it is an autoimmune condition. That’s probably because it isn’t one thing that causes it in all people.

My goal is to figure out what is causing it in Will. It could be candida overgrowth, an unhealthy balance in gut bacteria, a food allergy, lots of things really. I may not find the answer at all. The first thing that we are doing is cutting out gluten. If it’s a food sensitivity, that is the most likely one. Even if it isn’t, cutting out gluten will help with the other likely culprits too. We will see!

I’m baking a loaf of gluten-free bread right now, wish me luck!

Does anyone have any advice on eczema or going gluten-free? What are your thoughts?

Until our next adventure,
Moving Mommy

Blackberry Chia Seed Smoothie

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The Blueberry Kale Smoothie I posted awhile back is one of my most popular posts and was even featured at Adventures in Mindful Living, so I thought that I would share one of my other favorite smoothies!

Blackberries are rich in bioflavonoids and vitamin C and have high antioxidant levels. They also have a high tannin content which can help to reduce intestinal inflammation. They provide a sweet, rich flavor which is the part I like best! Chia seeds are a wonderful source of both Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids (they contain more Omega-3 than salmon!). They are also packed full of fiber and minerals. I find them in ground form on the natural food aisle at my grocery store.

Blackberry Chia Smoothie

1 cup organic frozen blackberries

1 cup organic greens (I usually use spinach or kale)

1/4 cup organic vanilla yogurt (you could replace this with a little more water for dairy-free)

1 tbsp ground chia seeds

1/4-1/2 cup of water (start with 1/4 and add as needed)

Add the yogurt first, followed by the greens, chia seeds and blackberries. Pour the water over the top and blend! Enjoy!

-Moving Mommy

Clean Eating on a Budget

With my Why Organic post, I told you why I choose to eat organic. Today I’ll tell you how I manage to eat mostly organic with very little processed food on a $150 per week budget for a family of five. When I first started on this real food journey, I didn’t think we would ever be able to do it. The prices of organic foods are much higher than traditional and take more time to prepare than processed foods. Once I built up my pantry and freezer, I realized that it is possible. It just takes time and effort to get there.

I can’t say that we eat 100% organic or even that we have no processed food in the house (I face some resistance from my other half:)). We have to make sacrifices in some areas to be able to splurge in others, but I still feel good about what we are eating. Everyone’s priorities with food are a little different. Some will buy conventional produce but not meat. Some will buy conventional dairy but not produce. What is important is what you think is best for your family. Many will not agree with the way I do things, but it is what works best for us. So here are some tips to get you on your way!

1. Start to build a whole foods pantry– I began buy purchasing mason jars, organic oats, and organic brown rice cereal. Each week I would make room in my budget for a few more things, like raw honey, organic sugar, whole wheat flour, and organic raisins. All of these things can be used frequently and still last a long time.

2. Buy in season or frozen fruits and veggies– I shop at the farmers market as much as I can, but it’s sometimes hard to even get there with three little ones! Right now, organic apples are inexpensive. My grocery store had them for $1.25 per pound this week. Things like berries are really expensive right now and their quality is poor, so we skip berries this time of year. For smoothies I buy organic frozen mixed fruit. The same goes for veggies like corn.

3. Eat a lot of greens– Lettuce, kale, and Swiss chard are all inexpensive organic options, so we eat a lot of those.

4. Stock up when meat is on sale– We cannot always eat organic meats, it gets really expensive to do so. A couple of weeks ago, organic chicken breasts were on sale for $2.99/lb, which is incredibly cheap so I stocked up and put it in the freezer! I also buy a whole organic chicken each week and cook it in the slow cooker. It generally makes two meals for us and is usually around $2.29/lb.

5. Eat breakfast for dinner– Eggs are high in protein and organic eggs are only around $4 per dozen.

6. Make your own snacks– I make granola bars, cinnamon raisin bread, apple chips, and apple sauce most often. This not only saves money, but cuts out a huge amount of processed food that we used to eat. There are tons of recipes on Pinterest!

7. Shop at a wholesale store– We shop at BJ’s Wholesale every week, along with our trip to the grocery store. They have their own organic brand, and it’s much cheaper for spices, frozen fruits, and tons of other stuff.

8. Buy a water filtration system– I used to go through two cases of water per week, which was around $10. I bought a filtration system to go on my faucet for around $30 and I only have to change the filter every four to six months.

9. Stay on the perimeter of the grocery store– everything in the middle aisles is processed. When we first started making the switch, I realized how much all of those boxes of macaroni and cheese and potatoes add up. It will really save you money. We shop the perimeter first and then go down the organic aisle for anything we need that is processed.

Right now, we buy regular milk. My kids drink a lot of it and organic milk is really expensive. I make sure to buy milk that is labeled antibiotic/hormone free. This means that it likely contains GMOs but at least my kids won’t be hitting puberty at 10 or getting an antibiotic resistant infection because of what they are eating. I do the same thing for beef.

That’s how we do it! We are far from a perfectly clean eating family, but I do feel good about what we eat for the most part.

Do you have any clean eating tips or recipes you’d like to share? Leave me a note in the comments!

Until our next adventure,
Moving mommy